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Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

1 edition of The abuse of bromides in epilepsy found in the catalog.

The abuse of bromides in epilepsy

by William Spratling

  • 236 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Epilepsy

  • Edition Notes

    Reprint from the Medical record, September 2, 1905.

    The Physical Object
    Pagination5 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26380431M
    OCLC/WorldCa77329871

      *Epilepsy Facts by John P. Cunha, DO, FACOE. Epilepsy is a brain disorder in which clusters of nerve cells, or neurons, in the brain sometimes signal abnormally causing strange sensations, emotions, and behavior, or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness.; Epilepsy is not contagious and is not caused by mental illness or mental . Bromides are used to control epilepsy in your pet. It is often used in conjunction with Phenobarbital to reduce the severity and number of seizures. It may take months before this drug achieves fewer seizures. It is very easy to overdose your pet on this drug because the helpful dose is very close to the toxic dose.

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures: Six patients treated with bromide Roberto b results.3–5 Triple bromides have also been used in the treatment of refractory epilepsy, but in the literature we did not find any important differences between these two forms of. “potassium bromide” and “sodium bromide” in December and October Addi- tional articles were identified through examination of article reference lists and book chap-.

    Bromides synonyms, Bromides pronunciation, Bromides translation, English dictionary definition of Bromides. n. 1. a. Univalent anionic bromine, or a compound of bromine, especially a binary compound of bromine with a more electropositive element. b. Bromides - definition of Bromides by The Free Dictionary. The purpose of this study was to present the evolution of views on epilepsy as a disease and symptom during the 19th and the 20th century. A thorough study of texts, medical books, and reports along with a review of the available literature in PubMed was undertaken. The 19th century is marked by the works of the French medical school and of John Hughlings Jackson Cited by:


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The abuse of bromides in epilepsy by William Spratling Download PDF EPUB FB2

Its abuse has grown great, and the routine treatment of all cases by bromides is not only poor therapy, but actual culpable negligence. Also, inWilliam Spratling, 23 probably the most recognized American epileptologist at that time, warned that "bromides as generally administered did usually more harm in the treatment of epilepsy than good."Cited by: Bromides, in the forms of potassium bromide, sodium bromide, and ammonium bromide, were widely used with good success for 59 years.

The advent of phenobarbital in gave practitioners another effective and safer alternative to bromides for epilepsy by:   Gradually bromides were more widely used for non-menstrual epilepsy. Dr Charles Bland Radcliffe reported his experience 3 of bromide therapy: “I put this mode of treatment into practice in five or six cases of epilepsy in which uterine irritation was a prominent feature, and with very satisfactory results upon the by: Bromides.

by Thomas A. Ban. Potassium bromide was the first widely used sedative in medicine. It is the potassium salt of bromine, the element that was named for its “stench” (“bromos”). Bromine was first isolated in from the ashes of seaweed by A.J Balard, an apothecary in Montpelier, France.

A Statistical Inquiry Into the Nature and Treatment of Epilepsy - Kindle edition by Bennett, Alexander Hughes. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading A Statistical Inquiry Into the Nature and Treatment of Epilepsy.3/5(2).

"The History of Modern Epilepsy is easy and pleasant reading and will be of interest to The abuse of bromides in epilepsy book involved in the care and treatment of individuals with epliepsy."-Journal of the American Medical Association About the Author. WALTER J.

FRIEDLANDER is Emeritus Professor of Preventive and Societal Medicine (Medical History) and of Internal Medicine Cited by: Review Article Use and Monitoring of Bromides in Epilepsy Treatment Melody Ryan, PharmD and Robert J. Baumann, MD Bromides are no longer a mainstay of epilepsy therapy because of the significant toxicity associated with their use and the availability of safer agents.

However, bromides occasionally find a niche in the treatment of. Bromide in literary usage means a phrase, cliché, or platitude that is trite or unoriginal. It can be intended to soothe or placate; it can suggest insincerity or a lack of originality in the speaker. When hypostatized and embodied, in which the concept becomes a person, bromide can mean a commonplace or tiresome person, a bore.

A now outdated usage of bromide is a. Bromides are no longer a mainstay of epilepsy therapy because of the significant toxicity associated with their use and the availability of safer agents.

However, bromides occasionally find a niche in the treatment of patients with refractory seizures, particularly in pediatrics. When the decision to utilize this therapy is made, the clinician may be frustrated by the lack of concise, Cited by: This remedy should have no place in the homoeopathic treatment of epilepsy; it is given here because it is the principal drug employed by the allopathic school, and because nearly all cases coming to us for treatment from old school hands are liable to be complicated by a previous treatment with the bromides, notable the Bromide of Potash.

Am J Psychiatry. Aug;(8) Bromide abuse: a continuing problem. McDanal CE Jr, Owens D, Bolman WM. PMID: [Indexed for MEDLINE]Cited by: 8.

the lancet an inquiry into the effects of the prolonged administration of the bromides in epilepsy. bennett m.d. physician to the hospital for epilepsy and paralysis, and assistant-physician to the westminster hospital.

(concluded from page )Cited by: 4. The history of the drug treatment of epilepsy in the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) century is an intriguing and tangled story. On the one hand, there were over this time many improvements in therapy, for instance, a much wider range of effective medication, higher‐quality evidence of efficacy, and better surveillance of side‐ by: Dr.

Beaman combined lactucarium and lupulin (Lancet, ii., ), and the addition of digitalis has been found valuable (Lancet, ii.,p. I have myself seen excellent results from the last-mentioned in conjunction with bromides, in epilepsy connected with masturbation or nocturnal emissions; it has marked control over such conditions.

1. J Am Vet Med Assoc. Nov 15;(10) Therapeutic serum drug concentrations in epileptic dogs treated with potassium bromide alone or in combination with other anticonvulsants: cases ().Cited by: Bromism is the syndrome which results from the long-term consumption of bromine, usually through bromide-based sedatives such as potassium bromide and lithium m was once a very common disorder, being responsible for 5 to 10% of psychiatric hospital admissions, but is now uncommon since bromide was withdrawn from clinical use in many countries and Specialty: Emergency medicine, psychiatry, neurology.

End of the Project Gutenberg EBook of A Statistical Inquiry Into the Nature and Treatment of Epilepsy, by Alexander Hughes Bennett *** END OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STATISTICAL INQUIRY--EPILEPSY *** ***** This file should be named or ***** This and all associated files of various formats will be found in: http.

Bromide definition is - a binary compound of bromine with another element or a radical including some (such as potassium bromide) used as sedatives.

How to use bromide in. bromide [bro´mīd] any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect; because overdosage causes serious mental disturbances they are now seldom used, except occasionally in grand mal seizures.

See also bromism. bromide (brō'mīd), The anion Br-; salt of. Join us at the Nanjing Art Book Fair, November (we added the feedback of the fair on this post) Continue reading Autumn fair, let’s go Nanjing.

Posted on Octo Octo Dots, coffee, rabbit. News about some of our past and recent artists published. 9mouth, Fabien Fourcaud, Maija Tammi. HOW TO USE THE BROMIDES* GEORGE M. BEARD, A.M., M.D., MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN NEUROLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, ETC. THEbromides are among the few great and sure remedies that medicinehas atits command.

They take rank with opium, quinine, and electricity, as forces thatwe can, ina good degree, dependupon to obtainposi- tiveresults; and .Bromide compounds, especially potassium bromide, were frequently used as sedatives in the 19th and early 20th use in over-the-counter sedatives and headache remedies (such as Bromo-Seltzer) in the United States extended towhen bromides were withdrawn as ingredients, due to chronic toxicity.

This use gave the word "bromide" its colloquial Beilstein Reference: Download Citation | The Rise and Fall of Bromide Therapy in Epilepsy | We are now accustomed to seeing new effective medicines frequently becoming available and replacing older drugs.